Kodi TOTAL BAN - Facebook joins Amazon and eBay in streaming box BLOCK | Tech | Life & Style - World Big News

Kodi TOTAL BAN – Facebook joins Amazon and eBay in streaming box BLOCK | Tech | Life & Style

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The so-called Kodi Boxes have now been banned from FacebookGETTY

The so-called Kodi Boxes have now been banned from Facebook

Facebook’s advertising policy now explicitly bans the sale of any streaming device that facilitates or encourages unauthorised access to digital media.

The social network confirmed to Express.co.uk that it tweaked its Commerce Policy to prohibit the sales of these so-called .

is following in the footsteps of similar blanket bans from the likes of eBay and .

The latter has taken an increasingly tough stance on streaming boxes that “promote” or “suggest” the easy facilitation of piracy.

Sellers who violate the policy could see any inventory stored in – with no reimbursement, the company warns in its updated policy.

is only one example of the media player software that can power these “pirate” streaming set-top boxes.

Facebook now explicitly bans any devices that promote piracy, like those powered by Kodi and its add-onsFACEBOOK

Facebook now bans the sale of any device that promotes piracy

that can be installed on a broad range of devices.

This perfectly legal software can be used to run third-party add-ons which enable users to access copyright-protected material for free – uploaded, shared or streamed from other users around the globe.

It’s these ready-made “pirate” devices – which are typically manufactured by a range of brands, but run the Kodi software and third-party add-ons – that are colloquially known as Kodi Boxes.

Some estimates currently place 20 million devices running Kodi in use in the UK at the moment.

Last September, the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT) branded the use of Kodi software to tune into pirated streams as an “epidemic”.

FACT CEO Kieron Sharp told Express.co.uk: “It is great to see Facebook follow the likes of Amazon and eBay in making changes to their policies to prohibit the sale of illicit streaming devices on their platforms.


It is great to see Facebook follow the likes of Amazon and eBay in making changes to their policies to prohibit the sale of illicit streaming devices on their platforms

Kieron Sharp, FACT


“These days social media sites are more than just a place to share photos and comments with friends and family.

“Unfortunately, the fast-paced development of these sites are being exploited by opportunists for criminal activity which needs to be disrupted.

“One of FACT’s priorities is combatting the sale of these illegal devices which affects not only all of our members and clients but the creative industries as a whole.

“Recent rulings have clarified that selling a device pre-configured to access copyrighted material is illegal and that consumers watching content via these devices without a legitimate subscription are also breaking the law.”

While online marketplaces, like those operated by Facebook, Amazon and eBay, are targeting the sale of these ready-made Kodi streaming devices – other agencies have targeted the streaming that enable the piracy.

The on streams fuelling piracy on these set-top boxes, like those running Kodi.

Speaking to The Guardian, a spokesperson for the Premier League said: “The Premier League is currently engaged in its largest ever anti-piracy campaign to protect its copyright.

“Like other sports and creative industries our model is predicated on the ability to market and sell rights and protect our intellectual property.

The Kodi media player software works across a broad range of devicesKODI

The Kodi media player software works across a broad range of devices

“It is because of this that clubs can invest in and develop talented players, build world-class stadiums, support the English football pyramid and schools and communities across the country – all things that fans enjoy and wider society benefits from.”

The which is aimed at stopping rights-infringing video streams of its matches.

This new ruling gives the league the ability to block servers which are broadcasting the games – stopping users of Kodi and other streaming devices from tuning in for free.

Until now, rights holders could only close individual streams which could easily be restarted via a new server. 

The Premier League says they are implementing the order because of concerns that fans are side-stepping premium pay services, such as Sky and BT Sport, who each pay huge sums for the rights to broadcast the matches.